Day-to-Day Life With Anxiety

Today I thought I’d give you some specific insight into what it’s like to live with severe anxiety. I often talk in sweeping statements and generalisations and I think people don’t realise what the nitty-gritty, day-to-day life is like because it’s not always rolling from one panic attack to another, it’s much more subtle, specific and random than that. I’m currently going through yet another very bad period of anxiety. I’m never really sure when I’m not going through one of these and the only way of describing the last 6.5 years is bad and worse. I don’t often notice the times when it’s bad until it gets worse and then I can recognise that what preceded was indeed “just” bad but it’s not better and worse. Like pain if you’re still feeling it will always hurt, it’s more and less, but not better. So I’m anxious and more anxious through periods of weeks and months.

As I said, currently I’m going through a particularly anxious period but it doesn’t necessarily look like you’d expect. It does include the typical worrying for hours on end about everything my brain can possibly imagine. It also includes having panic attacks about justifiable things, as well as not. But the things that you’re probably not aware of are what I want to talk about here.

  • It’s being tired all the time but so wired and highly strung that you can’t sleep.
  • It’s being exhausted and unable to keep your eyes open during the day and then your mind racing at 100mph at night and almost being too frightened to go to bed because it’s so severe.
  • It’s feeling sick and a feeling of dread in the pit of your stomach but with no reason or cause.
  • It’s your brain constantly scanning for whatever the threat is and then it picking something at random and fixating on that until it scans again and finds something new.
  • It’s not being able to remember things or take in new information.
  • It’s reading the same paragraph over and over again and knowing you’ve read those words and willing yourself to concentrate and take it in this time and still having no idea what it says.
  • It’s feeling full of completely useless energy and almost buzzing but your brain feeling like a frantic fly that just constantly throws itself at a pane of glass despite being next to an open window.
  • It’s forgetting your medication, day after day, and never managing to put two and two together and realise that you’ve forgotten it and that’s why you’re feeling extra wired and your heart is beating out of your chest.
  •  It’s being hungry and having so many choices for what to eat but spending hours not deciding because none of those things make sense in your head anymore.
  • It’s not being able to multi-task and having to mute the TV or turn it off because it’s too distracting while you’re reading a text or realising that you’ve missed 10 minutes of your programme because you’ve gone temporarily deaf whilst scrolling through Facebook.
  • It’s having so many hobbies or projects that you could continue or start and not being able to pick one.
  • It’s watching stuff you don’t even like on TV rather than stuff you’d love on catch-up or DVD because you can’t commit or decide on those and spending hours watching mind-numbing stuff just because it’s on.
  • It’s aimlessly walking from room to room in the hopes that inspiration will strike and it never doing so.
  • It’s looking out the window and watching the world go by, everyone having a purpose and you just wasting day upon day like this.
  • It’s flicking through recipe books desperately wanting to make something knowing full-well you can’t decide and aren’t capable of making anything much more complicated than toast.
  • It’s having responsibilities or ambitions and watching them fade away.
  • It’s having dreams and goals and watching them fade too.
  • It’s going without meals or eating snacks instead because you just can’t decide what to make and you can’t work out how to do it anymore.
  • It’s wishing that you could have certain meals and knowing that you can’t because there’s no one there to make it for you and you’re not able to do it yourself.
  • It’s losing even the most basic routines that you’ve built up and forgetting to make enough drinks over the day.
  • It’s running out of crockery because you didn’t time the washing-up well enough.
  • It’s remembering and forgetting multiple times a day to do the same chore or send that email or message and realising at 11pm that yet again you’ve not done it.
  • It’s writing lists of tasks to do in your diary each week and writing over 50% of that list again the following week and the week after because you’ve still not done the tasks.
  • It’s forgetting to look at the lists and feeling like screaming because this is so basic and you still can’t do it.
  • It’s checking and re-checking things because you can’t remember the answer and you stop trusting yourself.
  • It’s your tinnitus ramping up to deafening volumes.
  • It’s hearing your neighbours going about their daily lives through the walls and floors and feeling so alone and lonely.
  • It’s wondering how you ever functioned normally and how you ever got a degree when you can’t make a roast dinner or read a book anymore.
  • It’s not being able to write a shopping list.
  • It’s feeling sick at the thought of a timetable because you know that’ll just increase your feelings of failure when you inevitably don’t stick to it.
  • It’s wanting to scream and shout and cry and just sitting in numbness.
  • It’s wishing that you’d die and then instantly panicking and taking it back because you feel selfish and unworthy and you don’t want to cause others pain but wishing that this pain that you’re living with would end.
  • It’s wondering about suicide and realising that you don’t actually want to die you just don’t want to have to live like this anymore and you can’t see a way through or a way out.
  • It’s wondering how you can possibly make someone understand what this is like and then worrying that you will because you know how much it’ll scare them.
  • It’s being paralysed by fear.
  • It’s being mentally stopped from even starting anything because you’re so worried about failing even though you know that not even attempting things is a type of failing.
  • It’s wondering if this is it and if it’ll ever get better.
  • It’s wondering what you did to deserve this.
  • It’s wearing the same outfit days in a row because you don’t know how to choose a new one. It’s not being able to make decisions of any kind.
  • It’s not being able to concentrate.
  • It’s scrolling through Instagram and seeing so many craft projects that you’d love to try and never even trying to start one.
  • It’s being unable to work and having no responsibilities and still feeling like you have no time to do anything and never really ever getting anything done.
  • It’s wishing you could be someone else.
  • It’s feeling guilty all the time.
  • It’s feeling insignificant and over-noticeable all at once.
  • It’s feeling like a burden and wishing you could disappear.
  • It’s being desperate to make a difference, to help people and knowing that even with your limitations you could do it and never quite working out how or where to start.
  • It’s promising yourself over and over again that you’ll change and do things differently and it never happening.

So there you have it, a snapshot into the day-to-day difficulties of life with an anxiety disorder. That list is why it’s so difficult to explain succinctly what it’s like to live with. I don’t have particularly specific sources of anxiety, there are groups of situations I experience huge anxiety about including anything social and anywhere that I could get trapped but those are so huge, wide-ranging and general that it’s hard to give an accurate or detailed picture of what life each day is like and why I’m so unable to do things like sort out my own meals on a regular basis or fill my day productively, the list above hopefully gives more insight into why those things and so much more are so difficult.

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