Magic

Harry Potter Magical Artefacts Colouring Book – A Review

Disclaimer – Please read this disclosure about my use of affiliate links which are contained within this post.
Harry Potter Magical Artefacts Colouring Book is published and kindly sent to me to review by Studio Press. This book is the fourth in the Harry Potter Colouring Book series and my reviews of the first, second, and third can be found here. Grab your wand, bring a lantern, swat up on your incantations and let’s get delving into the magical artefacts of the wizarding world. This book is paperback with a glossy accented cover and a pale blue spine, it’s A4 in size and glue-bound meaning that a little of some images is lost. The images are a mixture of single and double-page spreads with many of the single pages having a thin border meaning that they’re not lost into the spine. The book contains 96 pages which are printed double-sided. The paper is bright white and thick (they’ve sorted out the paper issues since the first book), and didn’t bleed or shadow when tested with water-based pens, it’s lightly textured and perfect for pencils, you can get plenty of layers for blending and shading! It also held up fine to light use of water when activating the Derwent Inktense Pencils.

The images are drawn by multiple illustrators so they’re cohesive in content but some are drawn quite differently from each other. The images themselves include almost no stills from the film this time. There are a number of images based on concept art for the films and a few patterns are included which do feel a bit like “filler” images but there are fewer of these in this book than the first two (about 4 full page patterns) however, at least 24 pages are images with a centralised object overlaying a repeating pattern, like my coloured page of the sorting hat, and these get quite samey and dull. A huge number of different artefacts are pictured from obvious inclusions of wands, brooms, a time-turner, the Sorting Hat and horcruxes, to many of the items sold by the Weasley twins, book covers, the Marauders’ Map, Delores Umbridge’s cat plates and lots more. There are single and double-page spreads of objects and posters. This time there aren’t many pictures of characters though a few are included  At the end of the book are a number of full colour pages of the images included in the book meaning you can either copy the colour schemes in those or pick your own, they’re also great for helping you re-live the magic of the films and get yourself back into the world of Hogwarts – as if any of us ever left! I have to say, this book feels quite samey when compared to the previous three and they haven’t been brilliantly represented as specific titles due to the first book containing a real mixture of images and then the following three being specific aspects, many of the most obvious of which had already been featured in the first book. It just feels like it’s lacking, we’ve already had images of wands in two books, we’ve already seen the quidditch balls and different brooms, the collection of images is just quite random and the most obvious wizarding artefacts aren’t pictured well due to being shown in previous books.

In terms of mental health, this book doesn’t have an awful lot of impact on it unless you’re a Harry Potter Mega Fan in which case it’s likely to considerably lift your mood and give you hours and hours of distraction and enjoyment. The images take a long time to colour if you want them to look realistic so you will need fairly good levels of concentration. The line thickness varies from very thin to thick but mostly it remains thin so you will definitely need good vision and fine motor control to get the most out of this book. The best part of this book is that it has coloured pages at the back which can be used to copy or give inspiration for colour schemes, you can also easily google the objects and artefacts in order to work out exactly how to colour them so they look true to the film, or you can go it alone and try out your own colour schemes with purple broomsticks, glittery wands and rainbow time-turners – it doesn’t have to be realistic, remember it’s a magical world! Some of the illustrations are very intricate and detailed and others are much simpler with larger open spaces so this book does have a variety of difficulty levels to accommodate your good and bad days.

All in all, this is a good book, but I’m left disappointed, it feels samey and lacklustre and the image style gets boring quite quickly, I think a trick was missed by creating the first generic themed book, it really took away from the subsequent three specific titled books as the best bits of each had already been pictured. However, if you’re wanting to finish off the set, or you’re just a bit less picky than me then this book may be for you. The paper quality is good and there’s a wide range of objects and artefacts pictured, I just feel they could have been pictured in a better, more exciting and inspiring way.

If you’d like to purchase a copy it’s available here:
Amazon UK – Harry Potter Magical Artefacts Colouring Book
Book Depository Worldwide – https://www.bookdepository.com/Harry-Potter-Magical-Artefacts-Colouring-Book/9781783705924/?a_aid=colouringitmom

The image below was coloured using Stabilo Point 88 Fineliners and Derwent Inktense Pencils activated with water.

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Harry Potter Poster Colouring Book – A Review

Disclaimer – Please read this disclosure about my use of affiliate links which are contained within this post.
Harry Potter Poster Colouring Book is published and very kindly sent to me to review by Studio Press. This book is huge at a whopping 28x35cms, it’s paperback with a flexible card cover that matches the original Harry Potter Colouring Book and has the same gold coloured spine and a picture of Buckbeak on the front. The spine has a lay-flat binding and the pages are removable if you wish but they’ll stay put in the book if you’re careful not to twist the spine too much. The posters are made of bright white, medium thickness card which is lightly textured so it’s ideal for use with pens or pencils and would be fine to use alcohol markers on too. The posters are single-sided and a mixture of portrait and landscape orientation. The majority of the images have a border around them so they’d be ideal for framing with minimal effort involved. The book contains 20 posters, most of these are images found in the original Harry Potter Colouring Book with a couple from the other two titles, 2 appear to be completely new and another is a new rendering of the four House crests and the Hogwarts crest in the centre, all of which have been pictured separately before but not all together. Sadly, three of the images are wallpaper-style designs which I always think is a shame in postcard and poster books because it feels like a waste but we all like to colour different things and these may be your favourite pages. Many of the images are the same as those pictured in the Harry Potter Postcard Colouring Book. The pictures include Harry and Hedwig; Aragog; Centaurs; the Crests; Harry, Ron and Hermione on Buckbeak; Dobby, Fluffy, Cornish Pixies and loads more. There is a good selection of different characters, objects and scenes depicted but do check the images below to decide if these image choices are ones you’re happy with.

In terms of mental health, this book will be ideal for Harry Potter fans who want some escapism and who love the idea of being able to frame or gift their work, or even just to work on a larger-scale project. The images are all upscaled so the intricacy and detail level is decreased from the original book and is easier to colour for those of you with poorer vision or fine motor control; there is a huge variance in these levels with some images having large open spaces and others having much finer detail to colour within. The line thickness also varies throughout from thin to thick and also varies within some of the images so this is certainly a book that would be ideal for those of you with fluctuating conditions or concentration levels. The image content doesn’t have much of an impact on mood or symptoms of mental illness or other conditions, however, it does offer escapism and would be ideal to colour while watching the films or listening to the audio books so that you can truly be transported off to Hogwarts and be fully immersed in the wizarding world.

I would recommend this book to those who are fans of Harry Potter and those who have already been enjoying the colouring books and postcard books. This is a great continuation of the series and while a few of the image choices are a little disappointing, it’s a very solid addition to the collection and one that’s sure to be a hit with those of you wanting to frame, display or gift your work, or to just try out wetter mediums on single-sided images.

If you’d like to purchase a copy of this poster book, it’s available here:
Amazon UK – Harry Potter Poster Colouring Book
Book Depository Worldwide – https://www.bookdepository.com/Harry-Potter-Poster-Colouring-Book-Warner-Brothers/9781783705962/?a_aid=colouringitmom

The image below was coloured using Stabilo 68 Fibre-tip Pens and Stabilo Point 88 Fineliners.

Harry Potter Magical Places and Characters Colouring Book – A Review

Disclaimer – Please read this disclosure about my use of affiliate links which are contained within this post.
Harry Potter Magical Places and Characters Colouring Book is published and kindly sent to me to review by Studio Press. This book is the third in the Harry Potter Colouring Book series, you can find my reviews of the other two here: Harry Potter Colouring Book and Harry Potter Magical Creatures Colouring Book. A fourth title is due later in the year called Artefacts. Grab your wand, bring a lantern, swat up on your incantations and let’s get delving into the classrooms of Hogwarts and the nooks and crannies of Diagon Alley. This book is paperback with a glossy accented cover and a red spine, it’s A4 in size and glue-bound meaning that a little of some images is lost. The images are a mixture of single and double-page spreads with many of the single pages having a thin border meaning that they’re not lost into the spine. The book contains 96 pages which are printed double-sided. The paper is bright white and thick (they’ve sorted out the paper issues since the first book), and didn’t bleed or shadow when tested with water-based pens, it’s lightly textured and perfect for pencils, you can get plenty of layers for blending and shading! N.B. The US edition is published by Scholastic and has creamy-yellow paper which is lightly textured and does bleed and shadow with water-based pens, this seems to be the same paper as was used in the first print runs of the first book (more information about this can be found here). I would strongly advise all colourists to order a UK edition to avoid disappointment with paper, these can be purchased via Book Depository (link below).

The images are drawn by multiple illustrators so they’re cohesive in content but some are drawn quite differently from each other. The images themselves include many stills from the films which are drawn very realistically so it’s very obvious who each character is and they look just like the actors in costume playing them. There are also images based on concept art for the films and a few patterns are included which do feel a bit like “filler” images but there are fewer of these in this book than the previous two (about 5 versus 15+). A huge number of different places and characters are pictured from obvious inclusions of Hogwarts, Dumbledore’s office and various classrooms, to less familiar places such as the Weasleys’ shop, the Hogwarts Express, and the library. There are single and double-page spreads of film scenes such as Harry and Hagrid visiting Diagon Alley, the Sorting Ceremony in The Great Hall, Delores’s introduction in The Great Hall, Transfiguration class, repotting the mandrakes in Herbology, Delores’s office including her many plates of cat portraits, a Quidditch match, Hagrid’s cottage, and even scenes from inside Gringotts. All of your favourite characters are pictured too including all of the main students and teachers, portraits of the Fat Lady and Dumbledore, Voldemort, Fred and George Weasley, the Dursleys, and even Professor Trelawney. At the end of the book are a number of full colour pages of the images included in the book meaning you can either copy the colour schemes in those or pick your own, they’re also great for helping you re-live the magic of the films and get yourself back into the world of Hogwarts – as if any of us ever left!

In terms of mental health, this book doesn’t have an awful lot of impact on it unless you’re a Harry Potter Mega Fan in which case it’s likely to considerably lift your mood and give you hours and hours of distraction and enjoyment. The images take a long time to colour if you want them to look realistic so you will need fairly good levels of concentration. The line thickness varies from very thin to thick but mostly it remains thin so you will definitely need good vision and fine motor control to get the most out of this book. The best part of this book is that it has coloured pages at the back which can be used to copy or give inspiration for colour schemes, you can also easily google the scenes, objects or creatures to find images of them from the films to work out exactly how to colour them so they look true to the film, or you can go it alone and try out your own colour schemes with bright pink robes, green snow and yellow broomsticks – it doesn’t have to be realistic, remember it’s a magical world! Some of the illustrations are very intricate and detailed and others are much simpler with larger open spaces so this book does have a variety of difficulty levels to accommodate your good and bad days.

All in all, this is a good book, it’s better than the last because it’s more specific with fewer gaps in content and fewer “filler” images however I do find it less cohesive and a little more random. If you liked the first two Harry Potter colouring books then you’re sure to like this one and if you weren’t so keen on them then check out the photos of inside this one below before writing it off. The paper quality is better than the first and it’s great that you can use pens and pencils in it to really go to town! I would recommend it for any Harry Potter fans but do look at the images below so you can see if you’ll like it. A number of people have stated online that they were deeply disappointed with the content of the first book and I have to say I was a little disappointed myself, I expected more scenes and few, if any, patterned or object-focused images, with the focus of this book being on places, there are a lot more scenes so you’re more likely to like it if that was what you were hankering for. Pop on your robes, wrap up in your scarf (house colours of course), hop on your broomstick and fly straight to Hogwarts and get colouring the magical places and characters that reside there and beyond.

If you’d like to purchase a copy it’s available here:
Amazon UK (UK Edition) – Harry Potter Magical Places and Characters Colouring Book
Book Depository Worldwide (UK Edition) – https://www.bookdepository.com/Harry-Potter-Magical-Places-Characters-Colouring-Book-Warner-Bros/9781783706006/?a_aid=colouringitmom

The image below was coloured using Stabilo 68 Fibre-tip Pens.

Harry Potter Magical Creatures Postcard Colouring Book – A Review

Disclaimer – Please read this disclosure about my use of affiliate links which are contained within this post.
Harry Potter Magical Creatures Postcard Colouring Book is published and very kindly sent to me to review by Studio Press Publishing. This is the postcard book of the Harry Potter Magical Creatures Colouring Book, reviewed by me here. This book contains 20 postcards of single page images from the book that have been scaled down from the originals to fit on the 16.2x12cm pages. The postcards are standard size and have a lay flat binding which makes them easy to remove when you wish but is sturdy enough to keep the postcards in place while you’re colouring and for if you wish to keep them as a complete book. The covers are made of thick card with green tape down the spine, the cover image is the same as the original book so it’s easy to tell which postcard set matches which book. The back of each postcard has a patterned border (these vary a little throughout), an outline for a stamp and four address lines accented by a feather quill with a small varying symbol in the centre. Each of the 20 images is taken directly from the book and scaled down to fit the page rather than being smaller sections of the original design. The card itself is bright white and lightly textured (it’s a little different from the card used for the Harry Potter Postcard Colouring Book reviewed by me here), the card is fairly absorbent so when using water-based pens be careful of spreading and be aware that the colours appear a little darker than usual, I didn’t experience any bleed-through or shadowing at all. Pencil works well and you can build up plenty of layers or colour in blocks with no white tooth left. The images are printed single-sided and are a fairly good selection from the originals, only a couple of the images are the wallpaper-style patterned images which feel a bit like filler images, the rest are very good stand-alone images which you’ll love colouring! A great selection of creatures is depicted including centaurs, Buckbeak, Fluffy the three-headed dog, Fawkes the phoenix, Hedwig, and many more (all pages are photographed below).

In terms of mental health, this book doesn’t have an awful lot of impact on it unless you’re a Harry Potter Mega Fan in which case it’s likely to considerably lift your mood and give you hours and hours of distraction and enjoyment. If you enjoyed the Harry Potter Magical Creatures Colouring Book then you’re highly likely to enjoy these postcards and the different scale offers different opportunities for colouring the images again and being able to frame or gift them and they’re a much more manageable size for bad days when your concentration or focus are poor and you need a quick colouring fix. The images still take a fairly long time to colour if you want them to look realistic, especially if you use pencils but they’re considerably quicker than the book pages were. The line thickness varies but is a lot thinner than the book and ranges from medium to spindly thin but mostly it remains thin so you will definitely need good vision and fine motor control to get the most out of these postcards. There aren’t any pre-coloured inspiration images in this postcard book like there were in the original but you can easily google the creatures to find images of them from the films to work out exactly how to colour them so they look true to the film, or you can go it alone and try out your own colour schemes, it doesn’t have to be realistic, remember it’s a magical world! Some of the illustrations are very intricate and detailed and others are much simpler with larger open spaces so the postcards do have a variety of difficulty levels to accommodate your good and bad days.

I would highly recommend these postcards to Harry Potter fans and to fans of the Harry Potter Magical Creatures Colouring Book, they are great fun to colour and would be ideal to incorporate into craft projects, frame for a Harry Potter themed room, or gifting to others to share the magical love.

If you’d like to purchase a copy it’s available here:
Amazon UK – Harry Potter Magical Creatures Postcard Colouring Book
Book Depository Worldwide – http://www.bookdepository.com/Harry-Potter-Magical-Creatures-Postcard-Book-Warner-Bros/9781783705955/?a_aid=colouringitmom

The image below was coloured using Faber-Castell Polychromos Pencils.

Harry Potter Postcard Colouring Book – A Review

Disclaimer – Please read this disclosure about my use of affiliate links which are contained within this post.
Harry Potter Postcard Colouring Book is published and very kindly sent to me to review by Studio Press Publishing. This is the postcard book of the Harry Potter Colouring Book, reviewed by me here. This book contains 20 postcards of single page images from the book that have been scaled down from the originals to fit on the 16.2x12cm pages. The postcards are standard size and have a lay flat binding which makes them easy to remove when you wish but is sturdy enough to keep the postcards in place while you’re colouring and for if you wish to keep them as a complete book. The covers are made of thick card with gold tape down the spine, the cover image is the same as the original book so it’s easy to tell which postcard set matches which book. The back of each postcard has a patterned border (these vary a little throughout), an outline for a stamp and four address lines accented by a feather quill with a magical symbol in the centre. Each of the 20 images is taken directly from the book and scaled down to fit the page rather than being smaller sections of the original design. The card itself is bright white and lightly textured, water-based pens are ok to use but the finished result seemed a little speckled (see photo below) rather than just a block of vibrant colour. Pencil works well and you can build up plenty of layers or colour in blocks with no white tooth left. The images are printed single-sided and are a fairly good selection from the originals but unfortunately 5 of the images are the wallpaper-style patterned images which feel a bit like filler images rather than desirable stand-alone illustrations, however, this is my personal taste and others may well love these. Each of the house crests are included as well as a few pictures of the leading characters and some illustrations of posters (all pages are photographed below). My only criticism is that the printing, at least on my copy, is off centre and all of the images, including the backs of the postcards aren’t central and are instead shifted to the right towards the outside edge, this isn’t a major issue but it did bother my perfectionism and would make framing them a bit of a challenge if you were wanting to do that (do check other copies as this may have been rectified and could be an isolated issue).

In terms of mental health, this book doesn’t have an awful lot of impact on it unless you’re a Harry Potter Mega Fan in which case it’s likely to considerably lift your mood and give you hours and hours of distraction and enjoyment. If you enjoyed the Harry Potter Colouring Book then you’re highly likely to enjoy these postcards and the different scale offers different opportunities for colouring the images again and being able to frame or gift them and they’re a much more manageable size for bad days when your concentration or focus are poor and you need a quick colouring fix. The images still take a fairly long time to colour if you want them to look realistic, especially if you use pencils but they’re considerably quicker than the book pages were. The line thickness varies but is a lot thinner than the book and ranges from medium to spindly thin but mostly it remains thin so you will definitely need good vision and fine motor control to get the most out of these postcards. There aren’t any pre-coloured inspiration images in this postcard book like there were in the original but you can easily google the scenes, objects or creatures to find images of them from the films to work out exactly how to colour them so they look true to the film, or you can go it alone and try out your own colour schemes with bright pink robes, purple phoenixes and sparkly green snitches – it doesn’t have to be realistic, remember it’s a magical world! Some of the illustrations are very intricate and detailed and others are much simpler with larger open spaces so the postcards do have a variety of difficulty levels to accommodate your good and bad days.

I would highly recommend these postcards to Harry Potter fans and to fans of the Harry Potter Colouring Book, they are great fun to colour and would be ideal to incorporate into craft projects, frame for a Harry Potter themed room, or gifting to others to share the magical love.

If you’d like to purchase a copy it publishes on the 30th of June and is available to pre-order here:
Amazon UK – Harry Potter Postcard Colouring Book
Book Depository Worldwide – https://www.bookdepository.com/Harry-Potter-Postcard-Colouring-Book-Warner-Brothers/9781783705948/?a_aid=colouringitmom

The image below was coloured using Marco Renoir Coloured Pencils.

Harry Potter Magical Creatures Colouring Book – A Review

Disclaimer – Please read this disclosure about my use of affiliate links which are contained within this post.
Harry Potter Magical Creatures Colouring Book is published by Studio Press and is from my personal collection. This book is the sequel to the Harry Potter Colouring Book which I’ve reviewed here. Two more titles are set to be released later in the year, Magical Places and Characters, and Artefacts, and you’ll find links to those at the bottom of this review. Grab your wand, bring a lantern, swat up on your incantations and let’s get delving into the Forbidden Forest and the depths of the Great Lake (minus the lantern of course, unless it’s enchanted). This book is paperback with a glossy accented cover and a green spine, it’s A4 in size and glue-bound meaning that a little of some images is lost. The images are a mixture of single and double-page spreads with many of the single pages having a thin border meaning that they’re not lost into the spine. The book contains 96 pages which are printed double-sided. The paper is bright white and thick (they’ve sorted out the paper issues since the first book), and didn’t bleed or shadow when tested with water-based pens, it’s lightly textured and perfect for pencils, you can get plenty of layers for blending and shading! You can see the difference in paper thickness just by looking at the spines of the books (see photo below), the green-spined book is noticeably thicker than my original copy of the Harry Potter colouring book.

The images are drawn by multiple illustrators so they’re cohesive in content but some are drawn quite differently from each other. The images themselves include many stills from the films which are drawn very realistically so it’s very obvious who each character is and they look just like the actors in costume playing them. There are also images based on concept art for the films and a number of patterns are included which do feel a bit like “filler” images but there are fewer of these in this book than the Harry Potter Colouring Book (about 10 versus 15+). A huge number of different creatures are pictured from obvious inclusions of Buckbeak, Fang, and Fluffy the three-headed dog, to less common creatures like Cornish pixies and pygmy puffs. There are single and double-page spreads of film scenes such as Fawkes hatching in Dumbledore’s hand, Hermione meeting Grawp (Hagrid’s giant half-brother) in the Forbidden Forest, the troll in the girls’ toilets holding Harry up by his ankle, and the dragon escaping from Gringotts. All of your favourite magical creatures are pictured, including Dobby the House Elf, Hedwig – Harry’s owl, Crookshanks – Hermione’s cat, and Fawkes the Phoenix, and more menacing creatures like Aragog – the giant spider and all of her children, Nagini the snake, the basilisk, and dementors, as well as some of the more detached creatures like thestrals, centaurs, mandrakes, dragons, trolls and merpeople. At the end of the book are a number of full colour pages of the images included in the book meaning you can either copy the colour schemes in those or pick your own, they’re also great for helping you re-live the magic of the films and get yourself back into the world of Hogwarts – as if any of us ever left!

In terms of mental health, this book doesn’t have an awful lot of impact on it unless you’re a Harry Potter Mega Fan in which case it’s likely to considerably lift your mood and give you hours and hours of distraction and enjoyment. The images take a long time to colour if you want them to look realistic so you will need fairly good levels of concentration. The line thickness varies from very thin to thick but mostly it remains thin so you will definitely need good vision and fine motor control to get the most out of this book. The best part of this book is that it has coloured pages at the back which can be used to copy or give inspiration for colour schemes, you can also easily google the scenes, objects or creatures to find images of them from the films to work out exactly how to colour them so they look true to the film, or you can go it alone and try out your own colour schemes with bright pink robes, purple trolls and sparkly green dementors – it doesn’t have to be realistic, remember it’s a magical world! Some of the illustrations are very intricate and detailed and others are much simpler with larger open spaces so this book does have a variety of difficulty levels to accommodate your good and bad days.

All in all, this is a good book, it’s better than the last because it’s more specific with fewer gaps in content and fewer “filler” images. If you liked the Harry Potter colouring book then you’re sure to like this one and if you weren’t so keen on it then check out the photos of inside this one below before writing it off. The paper quality is so much better and it’s great that you can use pens and pencils in it to really go to town! I would recommend it for any Harry Potter fans but do look at the images below so you can see if you’ll like it. A number of people have stated online that they were deeply disappointed with the content of the last book and I have to say I was a little disappointed myself, I expected more scenes and few, if any, patterned or object-focused images, there are fewer in this book but they are still definitely there so as long as you’re aware of this and are ok with it, you’re sure to love it! Pop on your robes, wrap up in your scarf (house colours of course), hop on your broomstick and fly straight to Hogwarts and get colouring the magical creatures that reside there and beyond.

If you’d like to purchase a copy it’s available here:
Amazon UK – Harry Potter Magical Creatures Colouring Book
Book Depository Worldwide – http://www.bookdepository.com/Harry-Potter-Magical-Creatures-Colouring-Book-Warner-Brothers/9781783705825/?a_aid=colouringitmom

You can pre-order the other two titles here, please bear in mind that some of these are currently only available to pre-order in US English so do check when ordering:
Harry Potter Magical Places and Characters
Amazon UK – Harry Potter Magical Places & Characters Coloring Book
Book Depository Worldwide – http://www.bookdepository.com/HARRY-POTTER-MAGICAL-PLACES–CHARACTERS-null/9781608877997/?a_aid=colouringitmom

Harry Potter Artefacts/Artifacts
Amazon UK – Harry Potter Artifacts Colouring Book
Book Depository Worldwide – http://www.bookdepository.com/Harry-Potter-Magical-Artifacts-Coloring-Book-Inc-Scholastic/9781338030020/?a_aid=colouringitmom

If you’d like to purchase a copy of the Harry Potter Colouring Book it’s available here:
Review – Harry Potter Colouring Book
Amazon UK – Harry Potter Colouring Book
Book Depository Worldwide – https://www.bookdepository.com/Harry-Potter-Colouring-Book-Warner-Brothers/9781783705481/?a_aid=colouringitmom

The image below was coloured using Faber-Castell Polychromos Pencils.

Harry Potter Colouring Book – A Review

Disclaimer – Please read this disclosure about my use of affiliate links which are contained within this post.
Harry Potter Colouring Book is published by Studio Press and is from my personal collection. Before I get on with the rest of the review I need to mention the paper in this book. According to Amazon UK, the paper for this book is supplied by multiple sources meaning some copies have white pages and others have off-white pages. The paper thickness apparently varies too. This means that my review will not be representative of all copies. Sorry about this but there’s nothing I can do about it as I can’t get all of the different types of copies. Amazon state that you cannot choose which type of paper you’ll get so it’s pot luck. I’d suggest, if you’re bothered about paper colour and quality to get your copy from a book shop if you possibly can, if like me, you’re housebound, I’m afraid you’ll be at the mercy of random luck. My copy is ‘off-white’, in reality it’s very yellowy and the paper is thin and smooth. Water-based pens bleed through on my copy so this is definitely a pencil only book and Amazon suggest this too.

Now that issue has been addressed, I can get on with the review in the usual way. Grab your time-turner, set it spinning and go back in time to relive all of the books and films from the very first one. This book is paperback with a glossy accented cover and a gold spine, it’s A4 in size and has a glue-bound spine meaning that a little of each image is lost into the spine. The images are a mixture of single and double-page spreads with many of the single pages having a thin border meaning that they’re not lost into the spine. The book contains 96 pages which are printed double-sided and, as mentioned before, the paper (at least in my copy) isn’t suitable for water-based pens and only suits pencils. However, it’s great paper for pencils and despite having almost no tooth, I found it really easy to blend and shade using my coloured pencils. You may not fancy the off-white, yellowy colour and neither did I but actually it looks quite like parchment so it’s less of a disappointment than you’d expect.

The images themselves include many stills from the films which are drawn very realistically so it’s very obvious who each character is and they look just like the actors in costume playing them. A number of poster-style images are included of adverts for the Quidditch World Cup and for The Quibbler. There are also lots of images of objects and magical creatures as well as references to each of the houses including their crests and emblematic animals. Some of the images are scenes, others are patterns, and others are random collections of objects like a double page spread showing Harry’s scarf, scar and glasses. All of the main characters are included, from Harry, Ron and Hermione, to Dumbledore, Hagrid and Snape, and notable baddies including Draco Malfoy, Bellatrix Lestrange, Peter Pettigrew and the most notorious of them all – He Who Must Not Be Named – Oh go on then, Lord Voldermort. Lots of the most loved magical creatures are pictured too including, Buckbeak, Fluffy the three-headed dog, Dobby the house elf, Fawkes the Phoenix, and some of the less loved creatures including the dementors, pixies, mermaids and trolls. A few iconic scenes are illustrated from Harry and Ron driving the flying car, to Harry running from the Basilisk, Harry battling to get to the Golden Snitch before Draco Malfoy, to Harry’s final battle with Lord Voldermort. At the end of the book are a number of full colour pages of the images included in the book meaning you can either copy the colour schemes in those or pick your own, they’re also great for helping you re-live the magic of the films and get yourself back into the world of Hogwarts – as if any of us ever left! A few other images worth mentioning is a double-page spread of the main characters’ wands, a picture of Quidditch paraphernalia, a double-page spread of Dumbledore’s army and a lovely spread filled with Golden Snitches which will really get you practising and honing your blending and shading skills.

In terms of mental health, this book doesn’t have an awful lot of impact on it unless you’re a Harry Potter Mega Fan in which case it’s likely to considerably lift your mood and give you hours and hours of distraction and enjoyment. The images take a long time to colour if you want them to look realistic so you will need fairly good levels of concentration. The line thickness varies from very thin to thick but mostly it remains thin so you will definitely need good vision and fine motor control to get the most out of this book. The best part of this book is that it has coloured pages at the back which can be used to copy or give inspiration for colour schemes, you can also easily google the scenes, objects or creatures to find images of them from the films to work out exactly how to colour them so they look true to the film, or you can go it alone and try out your own colour schemes with bright pink robes, purple trolls and sparkly green dementors – it doesn’t have to be realistic, remember it’s a magical world! Some of the illustrations are very intricate and detailed and others are much simpler with larger open spaces so this book does have a variety of difficulty levels to accommodate your good and bad days.

All in all, the paper quality isn’t ideal but is great for pencils and does look like parchment in the off-white copies. I would recommend it for any Harry Potter fans but do look at the images below so you can see if you’ll like it. A number of people have stated online that they were deeply disappointed with the content and I have to say I was a little disappointed myself, I expected more scenes and few, if any, patterned or object-focused images but as long as you’re aware of this and are ok with it, you’re sure to love it! The only thing I noticed was missing was a really good image of Hogwarts, there is a double-page spread of it being shown through some trees but it’s a shame that it’s not a full page spread so that you can really get your teeth into it. Hop on your broomstick and fly straight to Hogwarts and get colouring the magical world.

If you’d like to purchase a copy it’s available here:
Amazon UK – Harry Potter Colouring Book
Book Depository Worldwide – https://www.bookdepository.com/Harry-Potter-Colouring-Book-Warner-Brothers/9781783705481/?a_aid=colouringitmom

The image below was coloured using Faber-Castell Polychromos Pencils.